What’s Happening Locally

Townsend, TN Fiber Arts Festival

Posted by on Mar 22, 2011 in What's Happening Locally | 1 comment

It's a dance, but no doubt about the outcome!

It's a dance, but no doubt about the outcome!

Fiber Arts Festival, Townsend Visitor Center, Townsend, TN

Fiber Arts Festival, Townsend Visitor Center, Townsend, TN

Sue Mason Finishing Off a Weaving Project

Sue Mason Finishing Off a Weaving Project

The Fiber Arts Festival was held this past weekend at the Townsend Visitor Center amid beautiful spring weather. This is one of the smaller Townsend, TN festivals, but the attendees make up for the smaller numbers with enthusiasm and there is nothing like parking only 50 feet away from activities for guests at our Smoky Mountain Lodging!

While the Visitor Center grounds held exhibits, demonstrations, a few vendors, sheep shearing and Border collie sheep-herding, the Townsend Elementary School held a marketplace of vendors selling their wares. Fish Lady and Friends Gallery also had exhibits and a Friday evening reception.

The Border collie sheep-herding was amazing. This is not your neighborhood dog chasing a flock of geese! While the handler gave commands by blowing on a whistle, man’s best friend did exactly what his owner wanted him to do quietly and swiftly. That pooch had those sheep weaving around posts, hither and yon, and right into the pen. We were told that each dog reacts to the sound of his owner/handler blowing on their whistle not necessarily to someone else, like their spouse blowing on their whistle to their dog.

As much as I enjoyed the Border collie’s working, I have to say the sheep shearing was my favorite. You just have to wonder if that sheep felt like I do getting a pedicure cause it kind of just laid back like a blob with it’s eyes shut most of the time. You come at most four legged creatures with a buzzing razor and it is not going to be a pretty sight so either Dean Fritz of Murfreesboro, TN really is at the top of his game or sheep really like “getting a load off their backs”!

Snoozing in the Sunlight

Snoozing in the Sunlight

You could watch folks spinning the wool into yarn, weaving, and all manner of “fiber” crafts. Sue Mason of Maryville was kind enough to give me written directions for getting the fleece, wool shorn from the sheep, to the ball of yarn stage. It’s a time consuming process and gives me a new respect for woolen garments whether they be knitted, crochet or woven. Blessings, mizkathleen@ Gracehill

 

 

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Thirty Historical Stops in Blount County Tennessee

Posted by on Feb 28, 2011 in What's Happening Locally | Comments Off on Thirty Historical Stops in Blount County Tennessee

2006- Little River Railroad Museum, Townsend, Tennessee

2006- Little River Railroad Museum, Townsend, Tennessee

 In 2008, shortly after the economy tanked, again, I was trying to think of an activity I could do with my nephew, age five, that was on the cheap.  Decided to take him to Sam Houston Schoolhouse and Museum.  While there, I found an out of print copy of the Blount County Historic Tour Guide that became our map on a three-year long odyssey.  It shows 30+ stops depicting the history of Blount County.  I have lived here for 25 years and had only been to four places on the list.  Kane had been to the Little River Railroad Museum in Townsend with me two years earlier. 

Sometimes it was more the journey than the destination.  I used the word “map” loosely.  The brochure designer had his heart in the right spot, but the dots showing the buildings could be off by a block or two or ….  One day, with no address other than Big Springs Road, we tried to find the “Old Stone House”, the oldest house in the county, built in the late 1700’s.  Never did locate it that day.  Called the Visitor Center.  They gave me some tips.  Didn’t work out on the second try.  Called the Historical Society.  He made a call, and gave me some pointers.  Nope.  When we spent a morning at the Thompson Brown House getting a behind-the-scenes tour by a wonderfully accommodating woman, she gave me directions. She did a lot of hand waving to no effect.  I am actually rather good at following a map, so after stopping at a gas station for further advice, and still coming up short, I did a U turn in the middle of the road and hopped out to talk to a Department of Transportation worker cutting grass on the right of way.  He was clueless until I said this home had been in three states and a territory, North Carolina, the Lost State of Franklin, territory South of the River Ohio and our own lovely State of Tennessee.  Bingo!  “EVERYONE knows where THAT place is!”  My suggestion is, when we pull out of the recession, maybe by 2020, the county pops for a marker.

I took Kane’s picture at each place but one.  The Mead Haven/Cox House in Friendsville, had three very big dogs in the yard which was posted with some kind of electric doggie fence sign. I would open the car door, the dogs would stand up.  I’d shut the car door, they sat down.  Open the car door; put foot on ground, they advanced 50 feet.  “Kane buddy,” I said, “time for your photo.”  He shook his head.  His momma didn’t raise no dummy.  I bought a big piece of black foam core board and glued on the brochure and all our photos.  Twenty-nine photos of Kane, and one of three very big dogs. We took the last tour today, Alcoa Aluminum Plant and the fountain they built for their workers in Springbrook Park.  Actually talked about and saw the whole concept of a planned unit development.  Many of the four-room houses are still standing with the original slate roofs from 80 years ago.

2011- TaDa! The Last Stop, Alcoa's Springbrook Park Fountain

2011- TaDa! The Last Stop, Alcoa's Springbrook Park Fountain

 I am a list person, and while it was wonderful to finish our journey before Kane enters college and I start collecting Medicare, it’s kind of sad.  Where do we go from here?  History tour of Knoxville? Washington D.C.?  The pyramids?  Scratch the pyramids.  We came back to our Smoky Mountain Bed and Breakfast and practiced making potato pancakes with stir fried apples.  We listened to the news about Egypt and Libya while he grated potatoes and stirred the apples in the pan.  For eight years old, he has an amazing grasp of world events and a memory like a steel trap.  Wonder who learned more?  Maybe the question should be, who will remember more! mizkathleen@ Gracehill

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Cades Cove and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Posted by on Oct 21, 2010 in What's Happening Locally | 1 comment

Abrams Falls, a 5 mile round trip hike, in Cades Cove, photo taken by guest Mike Malagold

Before Mom and I moved to Tennessee 25 years ago, we left Illinois in a motor home with a motorcycle and scooter hanging off the front and back. My goal was to see every national park in the United States, and Canada from Victoria to St. John’s, Newfoundland.  We were able to do that, over the course of 17 months, and even better, was the decision to settle in Townsend, TN just outside the Cades Cove Loop Road entrance to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  Of all the beautiful places on the North American continent, there is nowhere I would rather live.

I have been in the tourist/hospitality industry ever since, with the last 10 years as the owner/operator of Gracehill Bed and Breakfast.  During that time, I have sent and given directions to thousands of people looking for the Cove.  Furthermore, if you only have two nights, one full day in the Smokies, I say a drive around Cades Cove with a little hiking on its many trails,  needs to be at the top of the list.

The Great Smokies is the most visited National Park in the U.S. and Cades Cove the most visited “attraction” in it.   It is a pioneer settlement from the late 1800’s, early 1900’s, in a bowl depression surrounded by lofty mountains.  (Think spacious skies and purple mountain majesties…) It’s filled with log cabins, churches, cemeteries, a gristmill and my favorite, the barns.

It helps to know some things about the Cove.  It features a newly paved 11-mile, single lane, one-way loop road.  It opens at sunrise, closes at dark, and those are the two times you will see the most wildlife.  If you are the type to take home a pic of every deer, pull over so the car behind you can pass.   It is closed to vehicular traffic on Saturday and Wednesday mornings till 10am, May through September, for bicycle and foot traffic.  You can rent bikes at the entrance or bring your own.  In the winter or early spring, with no stops, the drive can take an hour and 15 minutes.  Weekends in the summer plan on a couple of hours.  In October, arrive very early and preferably during the week.  I’ll pack you a picnic breakfast to go.  Bring your camera and tripod for the mist rising off the water shots.  A Saturday afternoon in October, could take four hours.  Make sure you have enough gas.  The last gas station at the Townsend entrance is the Marathon at the KOA Campground.  If you make it out of the Cove on fumes, you can just about coast the nine miles back into Townsend.  The only tricky spot is the stop sign at the “Wye.”  I tried coasting once.  Was probably a little irritating to the driver behind me, but what the heck, I was in pursuit of empirical knowledge!

Cades Cove Primitive Babtist Church

Cades Cove Primitive Baptist Church

There are two gravel roads that bisect the Cove going in both directions.  If you start going through sugar withdrawal, hang a left on Sparks or Hyatt Lane and it will shorten the trip.  A little more than half way around, by the Cable Mill, is a visitor center and restroom facilities.  The last 1/3 of the drive is more heavily wooded, but my favorite.  Everything is closer to the road and most of the barns are there.

Books have been written about Cades Cove and the history of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, many of them here on the library table. You can Google Cades Cove and come up with 100s of articles from many different perspectives.  The Park puts out a good brochure with numbered stops.  You can pick it up at the entrance for $1, or I have multiple copies here, if you want to read it before you go. My intent was to write an article on the Cades Cove Preservation Association, with a little history of the Cove first.  Hmmm.  Next installment another day.  Blessings, mizkathleen@ Gracehill

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Blue and Red Ribbons for Award Winning Recipes at the Great Smoky Mountains Heritage Center Blue Ribbon Country Fair!

Posted by on Sep 28, 2010 in What's Happening Locally | Comments Off on Blue and Red Ribbons for Award Winning Recipes at the Great Smoky Mountains Heritage Center Blue Ribbon Country Fair!

Orange Cream Cheese Pound Cake with Strawberries and Whipped Cream

Orange Cream Cheese Pound Cake with Strawberries and Whipped Cream

Award Winning Pound Cake

Award Winning Pound Cake

From left to right- Elvis Presley's Favorite Pound Cake, Paula Deen's, and Joy of Baking Orange Cream Cheese Pound Cake

From left to right- Elvis Presley's Favorite Pound Cake, Paula Deen's, and Joy of Baking Orange Cream Cheese Pound Cake

For the fourth year in a row, the  Great Smoky Mountains Heritage Center had a Blue Ribbon Country Fair on the same weekend as Old Timers Day in Cades Cove, the Nawger Nob Arts and Crafts Show, and the Fall Festival at the Townsend Visitor Center. Saying it is an action packed weekend is an understatement! Just about everyone in our small town is volunteering (or attending) somewhere, and it is tough choosing when they are on both Friends of the Library (food booth at the Fall Festival), Hearts and Hands Scholarship Fund, (Fall Festival), or the Guild at the Heritage Center (Country Fair) etc. etc.

Since September 1st, I have been steady every day with guests; I emptied out today for a few days, in time to get my act together for OCTOBER. The leaves are still green, but today we got some much needed rain and the temps dropped dramatically. I am sitting here with the doors open listening to the rain considering putting on a pair of socks! Life is good. The fall display is up and I have been blessed with business and blue ribbons.

Last year in preparation for the Fair, I worked on my blueberry almond pound cake for the entire year. Must have made it 20 times, 20 different ways. Won 3rd place. This year I waited till three days before the Fair, and started searching on the web for a perfect perfectly plain pound cake. Eccch! Wednesday morning, I made Paula Deen’s and served it to guests. Wednesday night, I made an orange cream cheese pound cake from the Joy of Baking, but was the only one still up to taste it warm out of the oven. Thought I’d died and gone to heaven. Six hours later I was up and made another one for breakfast, reportedly Elvis Presley’s favorite from the Epicurious.com website. I tasted it warm and thought it was the perfect plain pound cake. Had my guests taste all three and it was evenly divided between Elvis’s and the orange. (Dear Paula, you can’t win them all…)  On my way into town, I had the neighbors try them and all the folks at the Sunshine Chiropractic office. At room temp, hands down, the orange cream cheese won the vote. It’s a good thing I ran it by a few people because I probably would have gone with Elvis’s, thinking plain would be better this time around. What makes his recipe unusual is it contains whip cream and you put it in a cold oven, then turn it on!

At any rate, I made another orange pound cake Friday morning for the Fair. We had a funeral Saturday morning, and the bake sale at the Fall Festival, so four pound cakes went the way of the gooney bird! We won win a blue ribbon, thank you, Joy of Baking. Don’t know if they are related to Joy of Cooking or not; that has always been my recipe bible. Click here for the link to the recipe. We also won a blue ribbon for my mom’s apricot bread. Again I made three loaves in two days, changing the recipe each time while Mom and I bickered back and forth. :-)  Her pumpkin pie recipe got a 2nd place finish. I am not much for pumpkin pie, but after winning a ribbon guess we better make it this year at Thanksgiving! I did mess around with that recipe also, tried to attach some cut out pastry leaves to the sides of the crust and added pecans to the bottom of the crust. The leaves sank and the pecans floated to the surface! Blessings, mizkathleen @ Gracehill Bed and Breakfast

Mom's Pumpkin Pie, 2nd Place Ribbon

Blue Ribbon Apricot Walnut Bread

Blue Ribbon Apricot Walnut Bread

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Scottish Festival and Highland Games held in Galinburg, TN, May 14th-16th, 2010

Posted by on Apr 9, 2010 in What's Happening Locally | Comments Off on Scottish Festival and Highland Games held in Galinburg, TN, May 14th-16th, 2010

Scottish Festival

Gatlinburg, Tennessee Scottish Festival

Scottish Games
Scottish Games

The 29thannual Gatlinburg Scottish Festival is a lot more than just a 2-½ day runner up to the week long Grandfather Mountain Highland Games held July 8-11, on Grandfather Mountain near Linville, NC.

The Gatlinburg, Tennessee games, held May 14-16, 2010 at Mills Park, 1230 E. Parkway, on the northeast side of Gatlinburg, spotlights Celtic Scottish history, culture, and events.  My family has attended a few times in the past five years, and one of my previous East Tennessee Smoky Mountains Bed and Breakfast guests, Roger Underwood, plays in the Knoxville Pipes and Drums which just appeared in the Dollywood International Parade.  He generously provided the photos for this blog.

The bag pipers lead off the festivities at 6 p.m., on Friday, May 14th, with a parade down the Parkway in downtown Gatlinburg.  If you are a Scot, you may walk behind or follow in a trolley.  A gala reception follows at the Quality Inn Creekside.

For a small admission, events start at 8:30 a.m. at Mills Park both Saturday and Sunday.  Highlights for my family have always been the Border Collie demonstrations, the Celtic rock bands, and the competitive sporting events.  But, there are so many things going on, you can pick and choose.  Visit with over 60 heritage and clan societies to assist in exploring your heritage.  Be sure to stay for the Ceilidh Under the Stars, which starts at 7:30 p.m.

Center stage is a plethora of bagpipe bands.  Click here for a U-Tube video of the Knoxville Pipe and Drum Band. Under tents and on stages, you will find Celtic punk bands, balladeers on guitars, and highland dancing.  Sheep dog trials will be conducted twice daily.  Men, women, and kids compete in both amateur and pro competitions for several stone putting games: braemar stone, open stone, heavy hammer, turning the caber, tossing the haggis, sheaf, WFH and heavy and light WFD.  Vendors offer food, jewelry, books, music, and Scottish clothing.  Visit www.gsfg.orgfor more information or call (865) 368-2543.  Dress for the weather, no pets allowed, and consider staying at one of the many bed and breakfasts in the area!  mizkathleen@ Gracehill Bed and Breakfast.

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A Spring Weekend Getaway, Golfing, Massages, & Shopping

Posted by on Apr 4, 2010 in What's Happening Locally | 1 comment

Laurel Valley Golf Course & Country Club, Townsend, TN

Laurel Valley Golf Course & Country Club, Townsend, TN

If you need to feel righteous about golfing while your beloved “makes do” with a massage and a half-day shopping the Pigeon Forge outlets, this is the event for you.  For the eleventh year, Friends of the Mary E. Tippitt Memorial Library are hosting their Golf Tournament Benefit on Friday, April 23rd, 2010 at the Laurel Valley Golf Course in Townsend, Tennessee. 

Proceeds from the tournament benefit the Library by helping fund the services that the Library provides to the community. (See below for the love story.)  Registration for the golf tournament starts at 11:30 a.m., with lunch provided for the participants.  The tournament starts at 1:00 p.m.  Entry fee for players is $80, with an available $20 mulligan package.  You can pick up forms at the Mary E. Tippitt Memorial Library, 120 Tiger Dr, Townsend, TN, at the Townsend Visitor Center on Highway 321, and the Laurel Valley Country Club.

In the past, a dozen or more teams of four players have enjoyed playing 18 holes at this beautiful mountain course.  Cash prizes are awarded to the best team, closest to the hole, longest drive, and longest putt.  This year a special plaque, which will be on display at the clubhouse, honors the winning team.  Numerous door prizes and a new car, for a hole-in-one add to the day’s excitement.  For more information call Mike Roach at (865) 448-8282.  For hole sponsorship contact Judy Krueger at (865) 448-6501.

Don’t you just hate the e-mails you receive that say “You have to read to the end”? Well, I’m glad you did.  In 1997, Charles Tippitt opened the Townsend library from scratch as a memorial tribute to his first wife Mary.  He rented the space and filled it with 5000 books for adults and children.  Over the years it has more than quadrupled in size and grown to a new location, and for a town our size, it is a marvel of information and activity including public access to computers and various children’s programs.  Later Charles married Ms. Sue Ann Schlosser, a librarian from Sikeston, Missouri.  Sikeston’s loss was our gain when Sue Ann relocated here.  Our community has been doubly blessed.  mizkathleen@ Gracehill Bed and Breakfast

At the Library and open to all, at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of each month is B.E.A.R. (Be Excited About Reading) Facts Book Club!

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