Highland Games, Scottish Highland Games, Maryville College

Posted by on Jul 12, 2011 in What's Happening Locally | 1 comment

Smoky Mountain Highland Games

Smoky Mountain Highland Games

A year ago I wrote about the Gatlinburg Scottish Festival held in Gatlinburg.  For many reasons including space, they moved this year to Maryville College, re-branded themselves as the Smoky Mountain Highland Games, and there is no looking back.  Attendance last year was between 2,500-2,700; celebrating this year, for the 30th annual time, the Maryville, TN inaugural event had over 6,000 in attendance.

The Daily Times, our local paper, certainly gave it a whopping amount of space.  Their calendar of events, headline and side stories may have helped create interest, but certainly the additional space and 2 to 3 times the tent space helped.  Of course, what better place than Maryville College, home of the “Fighting Scots?” One person was overheard saying it was redundant to call a Scot a Fighting Scot!

30th Annual Games held for the 1st time at Maryville College, Home of the Fighting Scots

This year’s honored guest was Lord Hugh Montgomerie, a chieftain of his clan and heir to his father the 18th Earl of Eglinton and 6th Earl of Winton!  Finding out more about your own clan is an important part of the festival but you certainly, don’t have to be Scottish to partake of the festivities.  Food: Scottish eggs, meat pies and haggis to name a few of the traditional offerings, were almost as popular as the beer tent.  For the activities, it really helps to go with the Times pre-printed schedule.  Friday kicked off with the Knoxville Pipes and Drums parade and a reception at the Clayton Center.  Saturday 8am-8pm and Sunday 8:30pm to 5pm was nonstop competitive events, music, shopping and demonstrations.  mizkathleen@ Gracehill Bed and Breakfast

 

www.GracehillBandB.com 866-448-3070   Info@GracehillBandB.com

Read More

Beekeeping, a Family Hobby for a Smoky Mountain Inn

Posted by on Jun 29, 2011 in What's Happening Locally | Comments Off

Father and Son Hobby

Father and Son Hobby

Most beekeepers are in it for the honey, although others maintain colonies of bees to pollinate crops, or for the beeswax, propolis, pollen or royal jelly.  My brother Mike and his son Kane started beekeeping four years ago, primarily for the pollen and propolis, and secondarily for the honey.

I talked to my nephew first.  To quote an eight year old, he likes beekeeping.  Opening the hive is cool.  They fly and crawl all over you.  I asked him if he wore protective clothing?  He said yes, an astronaut’s suit!  Can you describe it?  Hat with a screen, gloves, long socks, boots and an all white suit.  I asked him if he knew why the suit was white? He didn’t know. (I had spent an hour reading Wikipedi before calling him.)  I told him that natural predators of beehives were bears and skunks that were black and furry, so the suit by being white and slick, was as different as we could make it. So his mother may call him a skunk, but the bees could tell that he really wasn’t one.  He was not impressed.  I asked him what else he did. He said he pulled the tray out the bottom and checked the pollen.  He said it was NOT COOL if there were beetles in the pollen cause they eat it, so his dad would clean it out.  I asked him what he did with the pollen and he said he ate it, which he thinks is gross, but his dad thinks is good for him.  Other than hearing what colors their pollen was, the fact that the queen bee had a blue dot on her, and honey was good on bread, bagels, and by itself, I had pretty well sucked this hive dry.

On to my brother. He has one hive.  He says pollen is one of nature’s whole foods in and of itself.  Says you could live a good while just on pollen.  It has a complete string of vitamins and amino acids.  He said it also acclimates you to a lot of pollen allergies in the area.  He also collects the propolis, which is a tree resin the bees use to sterilize and seal off the hive.  Mike says you can make an extract with it by diluting it in pure grain alcohol, and it is good to use on canker sores, sealing wounds, etc.  He bottles the honey and shares with family and friends and our Smoky Mountain Bed and Breakfast, praise be!

In Pursuit of a Little Honey for Breakfast

In Pursuit of a Little Honey for Breakfast

So Auntie Kathy here would have to say, I’m leaning with my nephew.  I like the honey the best.  Mom makes a loaf of fresh baked bread and I pop a slice in the toaster, slather on some butter and honey and feel like the Queen Bee.  I think I could live a good while just on that, and I wouldn’t be inclined to kill the male drones when cold weather approaches!  Who else is there, other than the male drones, to put up the Christmas lights?  mizkathleen@ Gracehill Bed and Breakfast

 

www.GracehillBandB.com  866-448-3070  Info@GracehillBandB.com

Read More

Herb and Wildflower Day at the Townsend, TN Visitor Center

Posted by on Jun 15, 2011 in What's Happening Locally | Comments Off

Herb and Wildflower Day, at the Townsend Visitor Center, is one of the many smaller festivals that they host all year long in Townsend, TN, but the participants are no less passionate about their subject matter. Booths were set up under the pavilion representing several of the local Herb and Wildflower Nurseries in the area. Other offerings to round out the day included: fine pottery with a nature theme, a baked good sale, walks in the woods, classes and garden tours.

The day started at 7AM at Tremont with a walk lead by retired NPS Ranger Carey Jones featuring “Birds of the Smokies.” Afternoon wildflower rambles and hikes were on Chestnut Top Trail (“What’s in Bloom”) and Spruce Flats Falls (“Wildflowers on Rocks”).

The two most heavily attended classes were held at the Visitor Center. A 9AM lecture by Dr. Patricia Cox of TVA Natural Heritage on “Spring Flowers and Ferns of the Smokies” had an attendance of about 40 along with the 10:30AM lecture by NPS Ranger Adrian Mayor on “Wildflowers Pollinators- Bees and More.” Afternoon lectures were on “Exotic and Invasive Plants” and a “Blount Friendly Landscaping Gardening Class.” Perfect weather for the perfect Townsend style festival! mizkathleen@ Gracehill Bed and Breakfast

Katie Gamble with Overhill Gardens, Vonore, TN

Katie Gamble with Overhill Gardens, Vonore, TN

Susan Chattin with The Lily Barn, Townsend, TN

Susan Chattin with The Lily Barn, Townsend, TN

Sara Berry owner of Trillium Cove Home and Garden, Townsend, TN

Sara Berry owner of Trillium Cove Home and Garden, Townsend, TN

Read More

TroutFest, Townsend, TN, Hosted by the Little River Chapter of Trout Unlimited

Posted by on May 29, 2011 in What's Happening Locally | Comments Off

 

TroutFest, Townsend, TN 2011

Trout Fest, Townsend, TN 2011

This photo shows a fraction of the tents set up at the 8th annual TroutFest 2011, held in Townsend, TN.  A rousing success, as always, the festival is one of the largest of its kind in the country and the biggest in the Southeast.  It’s hosted by the Little River Chapter of Trout Unlimited to benefit trout stream preservation and restoration.  Last year they netted $45,000 that was donated to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park Fisheries Department.  This year, the festival had around 4,000 attendees including the guests staying at Gracehill Bed and Breakfast, our Smoky Mountain Inn.  Although the sport of fly fishing is enjoyed by men and women alike,  I’m here to say I have never seen so many solo men in the 30 to 60 age bracket, gathered in one spot  in my life.  Their minds however, were on 6 legged insect nymphs as in the “#12 George Nymph,” rather than the 2 legged nymphs of the goddess variety!

Top fly fishing vendors in the nation were represented along with some of the best known headliners like Lefty Kreh, Joe Humphreys, Bob Clouser, Zach Matthews and Tom Rosenbauer of Orvis.   This year heralded the premier issue of the TroutFest Journal which was clutched to bosoms like my grannie’s Bible on a Sunday morning.  Friday night had a reservation only banquet, and Saturday & Sunday was chock full of clinics, demonstrations, and heavy duty shopping.  Maybe the most fun was the Kid’s Casting Clinic, but the most original was the brain child of Paula Begley of Little River Outfitters.  She calls it a  “6 hole course,” that was a casting competition at six different stations with paper mache rocks, waterfalls, rhododendron  bushes and other assorted obstacles.  She hopes to do a 9 hole course next year, and I plan on spending more time scoping it out.  mizkathleen@ Gracehill Bed and Breakfast

The Orvis Booth at TroutFest

The Orvis Booth at TroutFest

Ian Rutter at the R&R Fly Fishing Booth

Ian Rutter at the R&R Fly Fishing Booth

Read More

Townsend, TN Fiber Arts Festival

Posted by on Mar 22, 2011 in What's Happening Locally | 1 comment

It's a dance, but no doubt about the outcome!

It's a dance, but no doubt about the outcome!

Fiber Arts Festival, Townsend Visitor Center, Townsend, TN

Fiber Arts Festival, Townsend Visitor Center, Townsend, TN

Sue Mason Finishing Off a Weaving Project

Sue Mason Finishing Off a Weaving Project

The Fiber Arts Festival was held this past weekend at the Townsend Visitor Center amid beautiful spring weather. This is one of the smaller Townsend, TN festivals, but the attendees make up for the smaller numbers with enthusiasm and there is nothing like parking only 50 feet away from activities for guests at our Smoky Mountain Lodging!

While the Visitor Center grounds held exhibits, demonstrations, a few vendors, sheep shearing and Border collie sheep-herding, the Townsend Elementary School held a marketplace of vendors selling their wares. Fish Lady and Friends Gallery also had exhibits and a Friday evening reception.

The Border collie sheep-herding was amazing. This is not your neighborhood dog chasing a flock of geese! While the handler gave commands by blowing on a whistle, man’s best friend did exactly what his owner wanted him to do quietly and swiftly. That pooch had those sheep weaving around posts, hither and yon, and right into the pen. We were told that each dog reacts to the sound of his owner/handler blowing on their whistle not necessarily to someone else, like their spouse blowing on their whistle to their dog.

As much as I enjoyed the Border collie’s working, I have to say the sheep shearing was my favorite. You just have to wonder if that sheep felt like I do getting a pedicure cause it kind of just laid back like a blob with it’s eyes shut most of the time. You come at most four legged creatures with a buzzing razor and it is not going to be a pretty sight so either Dean Fritz of Murfreesboro, TN really is at the top of his game or sheep really like “getting a load off their backs”!

Snoozing in the Sunlight

Snoozing in the Sunlight

You could watch folks spinning the wool into yarn, weaving, and all manner of “fiber” crafts. Sue Mason of Maryville was kind enough to give me written directions for getting the fleece, wool shorn from the sheep, to the ball of yarn stage. It’s a time consuming process and gives me a new respect for woolen garments whether they be knitted, crochet or woven. Blessings, mizkathleen@ Gracehill

 

 

Read More

Thirty Historical Stops in Blount County Tennessee

Posted by on Feb 28, 2011 in What's Happening Locally | Comments Off

2006- Little River Railroad Museum, Townsend, Tennessee

2006- Little River Railroad Museum, Townsend, Tennessee

 In 2008, shortly after the economy tanked, again, I was trying to think of an activity I could do with my nephew, age five, that was on the cheap.  Decided to take him to Sam Houston Schoolhouse and Museum.  While there, I found an out of print copy of the Blount County Historic Tour Guide that became our map on a three-year long odyssey.  It shows 30+ stops depicting the history of Blount County.  I have lived here for 25 years and had only been to four places on the list.  Kane had been to the Little River Railroad Museum in Townsend with me two years earlier. 

Sometimes it was more the journey than the destination.  I used the word “map” loosely.  The brochure designer had his heart in the right spot, but the dots showing the buildings could be off by a block or two or ….  One day, with no address other than Big Springs Road, we tried to find the “Old Stone House”, the oldest house in the county, built in the late 1700’s.  Never did locate it that day.  Called the Visitor Center.  They gave me some tips.  Didn’t work out on the second try.  Called the Historical Society.  He made a call, and gave me some pointers.  Nope.  When we spent a morning at the Thompson Brown House getting a behind-the-scenes tour by a wonderfully accommodating woman, she gave me directions. She did a lot of hand waving to no effect.  I am actually rather good at following a map, so after stopping at a gas station for further advice, and still coming up short, I did a U turn in the middle of the road and hopped out to talk to a Department of Transportation worker cutting grass on the right of way.  He was clueless until I said this home had been in three states and a territory, North Carolina, the Lost State of Franklin, territory South of the River Ohio and our own lovely State of Tennessee.  Bingo!  “EVERYONE knows where THAT place is!”  My suggestion is, when we pull out of the recession, maybe by 2020, the county pops for a marker.

I took Kane’s picture at each place but one.  The Mead Haven/Cox House in Friendsville, had three very big dogs in the yard which was posted with some kind of electric doggie fence sign. I would open the car door, the dogs would stand up.  I’d shut the car door, they sat down.  Open the car door; put foot on ground, they advanced 50 feet.  “Kane buddy,” I said, “time for your photo.”  He shook his head.  His momma didn’t raise no dummy.  I bought a big piece of black foam core board and glued on the brochure and all our photos.  Twenty-nine photos of Kane, and one of three very big dogs. We took the last tour today, Alcoa Aluminum Plant and the fountain they built for their workers in Springbrook Park.  Actually talked about and saw the whole concept of a planned unit development.  Many of the four-room houses are still standing with the original slate roofs from 80 years ago.

2011- TaDa! The Last Stop, Alcoa's Springbrook Park Fountain

2011- TaDa! The Last Stop, Alcoa's Springbrook Park Fountain

 I am a list person, and while it was wonderful to finish our journey before Kane enters college and I start collecting Medicare, it’s kind of sad.  Where do we go from here?  History tour of Knoxville? Washington D.C.?  The pyramids?  Scratch the pyramids.  We came back to our Smoky Mountain Bed and Breakfast and practiced making potato pancakes with stir fried apples.  We listened to the news about Egypt and Libya while he grated potatoes and stirred the apples in the pan.  For eight years old, he has an amazing grasp of world events and a memory like a steel trap.  Wonder who learned more?  Maybe the question should be, who will remember more! mizkathleen@ Gracehill

Read More

Cades Cove and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Posted by on Oct 21, 2010 in What's Happening Locally | 1 comment

Abrams Falls, a 5 mile round trip hike, in Cades Cove, photo taken by guest Mike Malagold

Before Mom and I moved to Tennessee 25 years ago, we left Illinois in a motor home with a motorcycle and scooter hanging off the front and back. My goal was to see every national park in the United States, and Canada from Victoria to St. John’s, Newfoundland.  We were able to do that, over the course of 17 months, and even better, was the decision to settle in Townsend, TN just outside the Cades Cove Loop Road entrance to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  Of all the beautiful places on the North American continent, there is nowhere I would rather live.

I have been in the tourist/hospitality industry ever since, with the last 10 years as the owner/operator of Gracehill Bed and Breakfast.  During that time, I have sent and given directions to thousands of people looking for the Cove.  Furthermore, if you only have two nights, one full day in the Smokies, I say a drive around Cades Cove with a little hiking on its many trails,  needs to be at the top of the list.

The Great Smokies is the most visited National Park in the U.S. and Cades Cove the most visited “attraction” in it.   It is a pioneer settlement from the late 1800’s, early 1900’s, in a bowl depression surrounded by lofty mountains.  (Think spacious skies and purple mountain majesties…) It’s filled with log cabins, churches, cemeteries, a gristmill and my favorite, the barns.

It helps to know some things about the Cove.  It features a newly paved 11-mile, single lane, one-way loop road.  It opens at sunrise, closes at dark, and those are the two times you will see the most wildlife.  If you are the type to take home a pic of every deer, pull over so the car behind you can pass.   It is closed to vehicular traffic on Saturday and Wednesday mornings till 10am, May through September, for bicycle and foot traffic.  You can rent bikes at the entrance or bring your own.  In the winter or early spring, with no stops, the drive can take an hour and 15 minutes.  Weekends in the summer plan on a couple of hours.  In October, arrive very early and preferably during the week.  I’ll pack you a picnic breakfast to go.  Bring your camera and tripod for the mist rising off the water shots.  A Saturday afternoon in October, could take four hours.  Make sure you have enough gas.  The last gas station at the Townsend entrance is the Marathon at the KOA Campground.  If you make it out of the Cove on fumes, you can just about coast the nine miles back into Townsend.  The only tricky spot is the stop sign at the “Wye.”  I tried coasting once.  Was probably a little irritating to the driver behind me, but what the heck, I was in pursuit of empirical knowledge!

Cades Cove Primitive Babtist Church

Cades Cove Primitive Baptist Church

There are two gravel roads that bisect the Cove going in both directions.  If you start going through sugar withdrawal, hang a left on Sparks or Hyatt Lane and it will shorten the trip.  A little more than half way around, by the Cable Mill, is a visitor center and restroom facilities.  The last 1/3 of the drive is more heavily wooded, but my favorite.  Everything is closer to the road and most of the barns are there.

Books have been written about Cades Cove and the history of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, many of them here on the library table. You can Google Cades Cove and come up with 100s of articles from many different perspectives.  The Park puts out a good brochure with numbered stops.  You can pick it up at the entrance for $1, or I have multiple copies here, if you want to read it before you go. My intent was to write an article on the Cades Cove Preservation Association, with a little history of the Cove first.  Hmmm.  Next installment another day.  Blessings, mizkathleen@ Gracehill

Read More